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10 Iron Rich Foods for Vegans: Part II

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Many vegans worry about getting enough iron in their diet. Since meat is traditionally thought of as the main source of iron, vegans need to find different sources to help them reach their recommended amount of iron each day. Fortunately, there are several delicious and easy-to-prepare options that are both rich in iron and vegan-friendly.
  1. Dried Thyme

With dried thyme at your disposal, cooking and eating your favorite vegetables will never get old. Thyme offers a unique lemon-pepper flavor that works well in many dishes. It also offers plenty of essential iron. In fact, dried thyme is one of the most iron-rich herbs you can find. And with so few calories, it makes a healthy, savory addition to your meals.

Serving Size (1 teaspoon), 1.2 milligrams of iron (7% DV), 3 calories

 

  1. Black Beans

Beans are good all around; they’re easy on your health and your budget. Black beans, in particular, are loaded with fiber, protein, and iron. That means they satisfy hunger while providing an energy boost that lasts for hours. Vegetarians who are concerned about getting enough iron need only add a one-cup serving of black beans to get about 20% of their daily recommended intake.

Serving Size (1 cup, boiled), 3.6 milligrams of iron (20% DV), 277 calories

 

  1. Brown Rice

Brown rice is one of the most versatile foods on Earth. It’s a staple in several cultures’ cuisines, and it’s widely regarded as an important health food. It’s naturally rich in fiber, it helps rid the body of toxins, and its high iron content also helps fight anemia and fatigue. Cook a serving of brown rice along with your favorite beans or veggies for an iron-rich meal that will keep you feeling full for hours.

Serving Size (1 cup), 0.8 milligrams of iron (5% DV), 216 calories

 

  1. Prune Juice

There’s a bit of a stigma when it comes to prune juice, but learning about its bounds of health benefits might help make it more appealing. Give it a chance and you might find that prune juice is not only delicious, but it’s also a potent source of iron. Its high vitamin C content makes it easier for your body to absorb the iron, so have a glass with your next meal to get the most out of the other iron-rich foods in your diet.

Serving Size (1 cup), 3 milligrams of iron (17% DV), 182 calories

 

  1. Oatmeal

Iron deficiency can be greatly reduced by adding oatmeal to your diet. Just a half-cup serving is packed with almost two milligrams of iron. And with loads of other nutrients, oatmeal is a fantastic health food that everyone should be eating more of. It’s an easy and healthy breakfast food, but you can also use oats to make granola, cookies, and other sweet treats that are both delicious and nutritious.

Serving Size (1/2 cup), 1.7 milligrams of iron (8% DV), 154 calories

 

  1. Dried Apricots

Apricots are an excellent source of iron and other nutrients. They can be consumed raw, canned, cooked, and dried, but dried apricots provide your body with the most benefits and the largest amount of iron. When apricots are dried, they lose their high water and sugar contents without losing their highly nutritious qualities. Just a handful of dried apricots can provide you with up to 35% of your daily iron intake. They make for an easy snack throughout the day, or chop them up to serve with other fruits or over a salad.

Serving Size (1/2 cup), 2 milligrams of iron (8% DV), 78 calories.

 

  1. Potatoes

Potatoes are one of the most versatile foods out there, and they’re also one of the best iron-rich food options for vegetarians. Since potatoes are also packed with vitamin C, it’s easier for your body to absorb the iron it needs. Potatoes work equally well as a side dish and a main attraction, so combine them with other iron-rich foods for a healthy meal any time of the day.

Serving Size (1 medium potato with skin),3.2 milligrams of iron (18% DV), 278 calories

 

  1. Sun Dried Tomatoes

Besides their mouth-watering taste, one of the best things about sun dried tomatoes is their high iron content. One cup contains nearly 30 percent of your recommended daily iron intake. Another great thing is that you can use them in so many ways. Sun dried tomatoes make a tasty addition to omelets, pasta sauce, pizza, sandwiches, salads, and so much more. They’re also high in healthy lycopene, antioxidants, and vitamin C, so add them to your diet for a health boost all around.

Serving Size (1 cup), 4.9 milligrams of iron (27% DV), 139 calories

 

  1. Molasses

If you ever get tired of eating fruits and vegetables as your main source of iron, switch it up by adding blackstrap molasses to your meals and even your beverages. Just a teaspoon of tasty molasses added to your toast, cereal, sandwiches, milk, or water contributes about 5% to your daily iron quota.

Serving Size (1 tablespoon), 0.9 milligrams of iron (5% DV), 58 calories

 

Via healthwholeness.com

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