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Vegan Ingredients You Should Keep In Your Pantry

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Popping by our favourite farmer’s market or local grocer was a pleasure pre-pandemic, but since we’re currently trying to limit our excursions to essentials only, we’re planning ahead and stocking up on a vegan and/or vegetarian ingredients.

For those of us who are in the position to shop less frequently, a well thought-out pantry and fridge give us plenty to work with when it comes to meal prep, following recipes, or even having fun with our own creations.

Nut and nut butters

These are a great source of protein for vegetarian and vegan diets and have versatile uses in cooking and baking.

We love topping a multigrain toast or waffle with a thick spread of nut butter to add flavour and a pop of protein (check the label and look for one that has no sugar added).

No-bake desserts often call for a nut butter filling, and roasted nuts are tasty over grain bowls or salads.

Try making your own nut milk by soaking raw nuts overnight — blend with your own flavours (we like adding vanilla and cinnamon) and strain through a nut milk bag or cheese cloth.

Seeds (chia, flax, hemp, pumpkin)

Seeds, which are loaded with fibre, vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants, are an easy way to amp up the nutritional value of almost any dish. We sprinkle hemp seeds (rich in essential fatty acids) on avocado toast and waffles, while chia seeds (loads of fibre, protein, fat, and calcium) can be added to coconut milk, maple syrup, and vanilla for an easy overnight puddingFlax seeds can be ground and used as an egg replacement in baking, and pumpkin seeds taste great roasted and lightly salted over salads and pastas. Try using a blend of all of the above and whip up a batch of homemade granola.

Baking ingredients and mixes

We like to have baking essentials on hand for when the mood strikes us — practically speaking, a tray of 12 muffins covers several days of breakfasts or if you’re more of a cupcake person, plenty of tasty desserts.

To experiment with baking from scratch grab some flour, baking soda, baking powder, and sugar, and if you prefer the ease and convenience of a mix keep a couple of plant-based varieties on hand.

Hot tip for using pre-made mixes: check the instructions for additional ingredients — you may need to add an oil, a sweetener, and something to bind like a flax egg or an egg replacement.

Quality oils

A good quality oil can make even the simplest meals taste delicious; we’d consider an organic olive oil and a coconut oil to be among our favourite pantry staples.

Coconut oil can be used for both baking and savoury dishes and works well at a higher heat. Keep in mind that although it’s stored in solid form, it will melt at room temperature, so no-bake treats made with coconut oil need to be stored in the fridge.

A good olive oil turns a simple pasta into a delicious side with the addition of some black pepper and lemon.

Rice and pasta

We often prep a large batch of rice and keep portions in the fridge to use throughout the week for meals such as casserolesfried rice dishes, and rice bowls. A whole grain or brown rice is quite nutritious and can be deliciously flavoured with kombu, or a splash of oil or vegan butter while cooking.

For extra iron we’ve also been adding iron fish to the water in our pots before the start of the cooking process.

Pasta is another one of our almost daily go-tos and we’re fond of the fortified variety (try chickpea or lentil) for adding extra nutrients and simplifying the steps to create a nutritious meal.

Maple syrup

It doesn’t get more Canadian than our love affair with maple syrup, but this sweet treat is nutritious and has many uses when it comes to cooking.

Maple syrup bakes well in gooey recipes like brownies, and sweetens smoothies and puddings as well as lattes and roasted veggies and of course pours perfectly over waffles and pancakes.

Nutritional yeast

One of the best sources of B vitamins for vegans and vegetarians, nutritional yeast adds cheesy flavour to a multitude of dishes. We add a heaping handful to pasta and stir it in with olive oil, and sea salt. Top that with a sprig of basil and some seasonal sprouts and you’ve got a yummy meal in minutes!

Nutritional yeast is the main ingredient in many plant-based cheese sauces, and makes a tasty topping for popcorn when mixed with a little oil and salt. Try it as a condiment to add a sprinkle of flavour to veggies like broccoli and spinach.

Tempeh and tofu

Tempeh and tofu are among our go-to meat alternatives, as they absorb flavour and can be prepared in a variety of ways — we try to choose organic and non-GMO where possible.

We lean towards tempeh as a preference, since the fermentation helps maintain balance in our bellies, and it works as a superb stand-in for bacon marinated in some tamari and pan fried until crispy.

Tofu is equally tasty and versatile — it can be grilledroasted, eaten raw, or blended into desserts and sauces.

Dried herbs and seasonings

Dried herbs add so much taste to simple meals, so we keep many on hand including savoury go-tos for dinner prep like basil, parsley, and a seaweed blend.

Cinnamon is our daily go-to for baking and breakfasts, while turmeric is a must have for immune-boosting golden milk and tonics. Sea salt, pink Himalayan salt, and black pepper are also excellent pantry staples.

Chickpeas and lentils

Chickpeas are a great staple because they’re a good source of protein. We use them in stews, to make hummus and roasted with a little sea salt to top salads or as a snack.

Lentils are another favourite — they’re often used as a meat substitute in burgers or tacos and are lovely in hearty soups.

 



Damaged people are dangerous, they know they can survive

You´ve probably been through tough times and that´s why you liked this quote. But lets be honest, it´s also very catchy. Because it would give your pain meaning and it would make you feel as someone not to mess with. But just because the quote is catchy doesn’t mean it’s valid. So is this quote actually deep and insightful or is it just a phony quote   that gets a ton of likes on social media; is it true or not?

So what are damaged people exactly? Well No one comes out of life without a few scars, and even the cool kids have demons. But some people have faced challenges that have truly changed and damaged them in ways that aren't fixed by youtube videos or articles on the internet. Being damaged means to everyone something different, but in general these type people have experienced some form of extreme hardships in their lives but they managed to get out of it. Some might say that they're are people who have died and came back to life with a  brighter vision.. And because they know life´s ups and downs so well, they usually show a great amount of empathy for other people. For example, we all know of an elder like for example your grandpa or grandma that has been through a lot, but still manages to be happy and grateful for life and we all wonder; how?! Well, because of they’ve seen it all and still choose love.

On the other side of the equation, not everybody that has experienced difficult times comes out a better person. We have to remember, damaged people are damaged. Many people who are considered to be damaged actually suffer from trauma and sometimes even mental illness.

Some seek therapy for this, others look for ways to cope with the situation in different ways that might not always be helpful in the long run. For example, getting into bad relationships, substance abuse or isolating themselves from their friends and family. Usually damaged people try their best to not get hurt again or minimize the pain that they’re feeling.

So what can we learn from damaged people ourselves. I believe that the biggest thing that we can learn from damaged people is to learn the lessons from their hardships and study the consequences of their suffering.

So first of all, study the people who have experienced tremendous hardships in their life, but came out a stronger person. You can learn how they handled the situation, what their mindset was, but also how much emotional capital it cost them. You can sometimes see in people’s eyes how their life has been.

 It’s hard to explain, but I’m pretty sure you know what I’m talking about. For example if you look into the eyes of David Goggins, you can just see that he´s been through a lot. But you can also see his fierceness and his determination and discipline. There’s plenty of people who have written amazing biographies about their lives where they share their mental tactics and advice on how to deal with pain.

However, even though I believe that tough times create stronger people, we also need to remind ourselves that we don’t have to go through similar experiences in order to achieve the same results.

People love stories about how someone who had everything against them but still managed to become a successful and happy person. These rag to riches   stories, sometimes glorify the pain this person endured in order to become successful. Pain or a level of discomfort is definitely needed to attain some level of success, but you need to know yourself well enough how much you personally can tolerate.

Pain can be for some people a motivator to get better, but for others it can make their life miserable. You should always evaluate your own skills and mindset whether you belong to the first or the latter category. And if you’re in the latter, then you first need to research how you can actually deal with pain, before you set big goals and create these high expectations for yourself and ultimately end up achieving none of them. This way your self-esteem gets damaged, and you’re worse off than when you started.

So is the quote damaged people are dangerous, because they know they can survive true or not?

I can definitely understand why many people can relate to this quote as it’s a very empowering message. It basically means that no matter how much shit life throws at you, you’ll rise again. It’s definitely true that there are people who’ve experienced difficult times and are now not afraid anymore of the risks of life since they’ve seen and learned so much.

However, it’s dangerous to identify with this quote when you’re for example young and haven’t really experienced that much. It could lead to inappropriate trust in yourself, that no matter how bad you get messed up, you’ll still overcome it. That’s why I would judge this quote as false, because it oversimplifies a nuanced message. With that said do you think of this quote? Is it true or not? Also, if you have any quotes you want me to review, let me know in the comments below.

 

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Tiktok; 100% Suffering (meat) – pig scene

100% Plants meat- plants scene

Tiktok 2; your food grown vs my food grown

 

Popping by our favourite farmer’s market or local grocer was a pleasure pre-pandemic, but since we’re currently trying to limit our excursions to essentials only, we’re planning ahead and stocking up on a vegan and/or vegetarian ingredients.

For those of us who are in the position to shop less frequently, a well thought-out pantry and fridge give us plenty to work with when it comes to meal prep, following recipes, or even having fun with our own creations.

 

Nut and nut butters

These are a great source of protein for vegetarian and vegan diets and have versatile uses in cooking and baking.

We love topping a multigrain toast or waffle with a thick spread of nut butter to add flavour and a pop of protein (check the label and look for one that has no sugar added).

No-bake desserts often call for a nut butter filling, and roasted nuts are tasty over grain bowls or salads.

Try making your own nut milk by soaking raw nuts overnight — blend with your own flavours (we like adding vanilla and cinnamon) and strain through a nut milk bag or cheese cloth.

Seeds (chia, flax, hemp, pumpkin)

Seeds, which are loaded with fibre, vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants, are an easy way to amp up the nutritional value of almost any dish. We sprinkle hemp seeds (rich in essential fatty acids) on avocado toast and waffles, while chia seeds (loads of fibre, protein, fat, and calcium) can be added to coconut milk, maple syrup, and vanilla for an easy overnight pudding.

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Flax seeds can be ground and used as an egg replacement in baking, and pumpkin seeds taste great roasted and lightly salted over salads and pastas. Try using a blend of all of the above and whip up a batch of homemade granola.

Baking ingredients and mixes

We like to have baking essentials on hand for when the mood strikes us — practically speaking, a tray of 12 muffins covers several days of breakfasts or if you’re more of a cupcake person, plenty of tasty desserts.

To experiment with baking from scratch grab some flour, baking soda, baking powder, and sugar, and if you prefer the ease and convenience of a mix keep a couple of plant-based varieties on hand.

Hot tip for using pre-made mixes: check the instructions for additional ingredients — you may need to add an oil, a sweetener, and something to bind like a flax egg or an egg replacement.

Quality oils

A good quality oil can make even the simplest meals taste delicious; we’d consider an organic olive oil and a coconut oil to be among our favourite pantry staples.

Coconut oil can be used for both baking and savoury dishes and works well at a higher heat. Keep in mind that although it’s stored in solid form, it will melt at room temperature, so no-bake treats made with coconut oil need to be stored in the fridge.

A good olive oil turns a simple pasta into a delicious side with the addition of some black pepper and lemon.

Rice and pasta

We often prep a large batch of rice and keep portions in the fridge to use throughout the week for meals such as casserolesfried rice dishes, and rice bowls. A whole grain or brown rice is quite nutritious and can be deliciously flavoured with kombu, or a splash of oil or vegan butter while cooking.

For extra iron we’ve also been adding iron fish to the water in our pots before the start of the cooking process.

Pasta is another one of our almost daily go-tos and we’re fond of the fortified variety (try chickpea or lentil) for adding extra nutrients and simplifying the steps to create a nutritious meal.

Maple syrup

It doesn’t get more Canadian than our love affair with maple syrup, but this sweet treat is nutritious and has many uses when it comes to cooking.

Maple syrup bakes well in gooey recipes like brownies, and sweetens smoothies and puddings as well as lattes and roasted veggies and of course pours perfectly over waffles and pancakes.

 

Nutritional yeast

One of the best sources of B vitamins for vegans and vegetarians, nutritional yeast adds cheesy flavour to a multitude of dishes. We add a heaping handful to pasta and stir it in with olive oil, and sea salt. Top that with a sprig of basil and some seasonal sprouts and you’ve got a yummy meal in minutes!

Nutritional yeast is the main ingredient in many plant-based cheese sauces, and makes a tasty topping for popcorn when mixed with a little oil and salt. Try it as a condiment to add a sprinkle of flavour to veggies like broccoli and spinach.

Tempeh and tofu

Tempeh and tofu are among our go-to meat alternatives, as they absorb flavour and can be prepared in a variety of ways — we try to choose organic and non-GMO where possible.

 

We lean towards tempeh as a preference, since the fermentation helps maintain balance in our bellies, and it works as a superb stand-in for bacon marinated in some tamari and pan fried until crispy.

Tofu is equally tasty and versatile — it can be grilledroasted, eaten raw, or blended into desserts and sauces.

Dried herbs and seasonings

Dried herbs add so much taste to simple meals, so we keep many on hand including savoury go-tos for dinner prep like basil, parsley, and a seaweed blend.

Cinnamon is our daily go-to for baking and breakfasts, while turmeric is a must have for immune-boosting golden milk and tonics. Sea salt, pink Himalayan salt, and black pepper are also excellent pantry staples.

Chickpeas and lentils

Chickpeas are a great staple because they’re a good source of protein. We use them in stews, to make hummus and roasted with a little sea salt to top salads or as a snack.

Lentils are another favourite — they’re often used as a meat substitute in burgers or tacos and are lovely in hearty soups.

 

 via huffingtonpost.ca

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